Quick Answer: Who Do I Love Or Whom I Love?

Who or whom I love so much?

Who or Whom I Love so Much.

The correct way to phrase this whom I love so much, not who I love so much.

We know that whom is correct because this pronoun refers to the object of a preposition or verb..

Who I love dearly or whom I love dearly?

“Them” is the objective case. So you should use also use the objective case of who/whom. Thus: “…, all of whom I love dearly.” (And so that first question should be “whom do I love”.)

Who I respect or whom I respect?

The Quick Answer: When to Use Who and Whom If a question can be answered with him, the pronoun whom is correct—just remember that both words end with an -m!

Is Whom am I grammatically correct?

Rule: Use whom when you could replace it with him. Example: To who/whom am I speaking? Let’s turn the question into a sentence to make it easier: I am speaking to who/whom. We would say, “I am speaking to him.” Therefore, whom is correct.

Who gave what to whom?

Rule #1: Substitute “he/him” or “she/her”: If it’s either “he” or “she,” then it’s “who;” if it’s “him” or “her,” then it’s “whom.” “he” (whoever) is the subject of the verb “called.” In the sentence, “Give it to whoever deserves it”:([You] give it to whoever deserves it.)

Who is she or who she is?

“Who is she” is correct. By using “who she is” you are actually describing a woman/girl, implying a direct opinion or stating a certain characteristic about her. By using the “who is she” is asking what is the identity of that woman/girl that you are trying to know about.

Who is example sentences?

Apparently Señor Medena had two children who denied him. How can he remember well his ignorance–which his growth requires–who has so often to use his knowledge? Jonathan glanced up at Alex, who met his gaze sternly. If he knew who Alex really was, he probably knew more than Alex did.

Who vs whom examples sentences?

For example, “Who is the best in class?” If you rewrote that question as a statement, “He is the best in class.” makes sense. Use whom when a sentence needs an object pronoun like him or her. For example, “This is for whom?” Again, if you rewrote that question as a statement, “This is for him.” sounds correct.

Who I feel or whom I feel?

Whom is used as the object of the verb or the object of a preposition. … This pronoun is the object of the preposition with, so whom is the right pick. Be careful, though. Make sure the prepositional pronoun in question isn’t also a subject—if it is, then you use who.

Who or whom she loved?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom.

Who or whom did you call?

Who/whom did you call? In this case, the correct form is whom. The grammatical explanation is that the pronoun is the direct object in this clause, so the object form is required. If you can’t immediately tell that by looking at the sentence, though, you have an alternative.

Who or whom should I contact?

It should be “Whom should I contact?” Whom replaces the object of the sentence. The answer to the question would be “I should contact him.” Not “I should contact he.” That’s the easiest way to be sure of whether to use who or whom. If it can be replaced with he, use who.